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What Causes Dry Eyes?

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Managing Dry Eye Syndrome

Dry eyes are a common condition that leads many people to seek care and treatment from their local eye doctor. Due to an insufficient tear quantity or quality, the irritating symptoms include redness, stinging and constant blinking or eye rubbing. These symptoms can range from mild to severe, depending upon the individual. Yet, no matter what type of irritation you experience, dry eyes can disrupt your comfortable vision and interfere with daily life.

If you suffer from dry eye syndrome, our eye care specialists can help relieve your pain. We will perform a thorough eye exam to diagnose your condition and determine the best dry eye treatment for your condition.

Typical Causes of Dry Eyes

Every patient is unique, with a different lifestyle, environment and health condition. To assess your dry eye syndrome fully, we will ask you to share details about your daily routine and habits. It’s necessary to pinpoint the cause of your dry eyes in order to identify the ideal, effective treatment. Some possible culprits for dry eyes include:

  • Atmosphere: extreme weather – such as frigid temperatures or very arid conditions, can place stress on your eyes, preventing them from making enough lubricating tears. In these surroundings, goggles or wraparound sunglasses can help protect against dry eyes. In very hot climates, staying well hydrated may also help. Smoke, wind and dust may also cause dry eye irritation.
  • A/C or heating: air-conditioning, heating and fans are all associated directly with drying out your eyes. To counter this problem, it’s worthwhile to invest in a humidifier.
  • Allergies: seasonal allergies have been shown to have a powerful impact on eye moisture. When the pollen count is very high in our area, many of our patients complain about dry eye symptoms. An indoor air filter may be the best way to solve this problem.
  • Blepharitis: this skin condition affects the tissue along the edge of your eyelids. Caused generally by blocked oil ducts, blepharitis affects your eye’s ability to produce healthy tears. Rosacea is another skin condition that may block your eyes’ oil glands.
  • Inadequate tear quantity: a decrease in the amount of tears that your eyes produce can be due to many different reasons. Officially called keratoconjunctivitis sicca, this condition may be improved by taking omega-3 fish oil.
  • Aging and health: this is another typical cause of insufficient tears, as well as specific medical conditions – including lupus, diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid conditions, Sjorgen’s syndrome, scleroderma and vitamin A deficiency. Undergoing LASIK may also be to blame.
  • Side effects of medication: weak tear production may also be caused by certain drugs. Be sure to tell your eye doctor about any medical treatments or therapies you are taking.

Treatment for Dry Eyes

Although dry eye tends to be a chronic condition with no cure, there are many effective treatments that can alleviate the discomfort. Our eye care providers are experienced and knowledgeable about this condition, and we’ll work with you patiently to manage your dry eye syndrome.

Possible treatments include:

  • Artificial tears or lubricant eye drops, which compensate for your lack of natural tears. Check with your eye doctor regarding the best brand to use for your condition.
  • Prescription eye drops that stimulate tear production, or steroid eye drops for short-term pain relief
  • Heated compresses to open up clogged tear ducts, especially if you suffer from Meibomian gland dysfunction.
  • Specialized eyelid scrubs to treat blepharitis, or antibiotic drops
  • Punctal inserts may be prescribed to treat severe dry eyes. Placed inside your lower eyelid, these inserts gradually release lubrication as the day goes on.
  • Punctal plugs may help with extreme cases. During a quick, in-office procedure, our eye doctors will insert tiny silicone plugs into the corner of your eye to block drainage, which helps tears to disperse better across the eye.
  • Changing the type of contact lenses that you wear. Some types of contacts can dry out eyes, while others can help maintain moisture and resolve the symptoms.

Dry eye syndrome requires constant treatment to keep the irritating symptoms from flaring up. Our optometrists will help design a long-term, efficient strategy to restore your comfortable and healthy vision.

Treating Dry Eyes Near You

6 Habits That Cause Dry Eyes

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Our Dry Eye Specialists Explain Causes of Dry Eyes

Are you always rubbing your eyes or blinking constantly to spread more moisture across the surface? Dry eyes can be extremely irritating, even painful for some people. Inadequate lubrication may cause sore eyes, redness, an inability to wear contact lenses and overall uncomfortable vision. At our eye care clinic, our experienced, expert eye doctors will perform a thorough eye exam to diagnose Dry Eye Syndrome.

As every patient is unique, our eye exam will include questions about your personal lifestyle in order to identify what’s causing your dry eyes. Finding the cause is the best way to find an effective solution!

Depending upon the results of your eye exam, we’ll recommend a number of lifestyle changes to help alleviate the annoying symptoms caused by your dry eyes. We asked our Nob Hill Eye Specialists and they’ve offered 6 possible culprits for Dry Eye Syndrome:

1. Extreme Weather Conditions

Whether it’s summer or winter, extreme weather can stress your eyes so that they can’t produce enough tears to keep your eyes lubricated well. In the winter, it’s helpful to wear goggles or glasses to protect your eyes from frigid temperatures and wind. This is particularly beneficial when you hit the ski slopes or lace up your ice skates. In the summer, heat can lead to dehydration, which saps the moisture from your eyes too. The best way to avoid this problem and stay comfortable is simply to drink enough!

2. A/C or Indoor Heating

Air-conditioning, fans and indoor heating are directly linked with drying out your eyes. Blowing air evaporates moisture from your eyes more quickly, and it also dries out the atmosphere inside your home or office. A humidifier is a worthwhile investment to solve this problem. In the winter, a humidifier will give you an extra bonus of keeping your sinuses moist too, which helps to relieve the symptoms of your winter cold.

3. Seasonal Allergies

Recent studies have shown a strong link between spring allergens and dry eyes. When pollen counts are highest. an increased number of patients visit our eye doctors with complaints of dry eye symptoms. During allergy season, using an air filter indoors may be the most efficient way to avoid the effects of pollen on your eyes.

4. Skin Conditions

Specific skin conditions and disorders are associated with dry eyes. Blepharitis, which refers to an inflammation of the skin along the edge of your eyelids, often leads to Dry Eye Syndrome, because the oil-producing glands are often clogged. This ruins your eyes’ ability to produce tears with a healthy composition of oil. Rosacea, an inflammatory skin condition that generally appears on the face, may also block the oil-producing glands of your eyes.

5. Environmental Effects of the Great Outdoors

While fresh, outdoor air is generally healthy for your eyes, skin and lungs, too much exposure to smoke, wind, dust, and extreme temperatures can certainly lead to eye dehydration. Global climate change has been blamed for many of these ill effects, as your tear film depends upon natural humidity to stay moist. Yet as our environments have changed (and continue to change), the amount of hydration that your eyes can obtain from the outdoor environment has been reduced. Air pollution is also detrimental to healthy eyes, damaging and drying out your tear film.

6. Low-Tear Production

Our eye doctors diagnose many cases of dry eyes that are due to a reduced tear production. Officially termed keratoconjunctivitis sicca, a decreased manufacture of tears can result from a variety of causes. To stimulate tear production, it may be helpful to up your intake of omega-3 fish oil.

Aging is a common reason for inadequate tear production, as well as certain medical disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, diabetes, thyroid conditions, scleroderma, vitamin A deficiency and Sjorgen’s syndrome. If you’ve undergone radiation treatments, your tear glands may have suffered damage. Laser eye surgery is another potential culprit, however symptoms of dry eyes due to these procedures are generally short-lived.

When your eyes are unable to keep up with healthy tear production, it’s a good idea to take a look at any medications you’re taking. Common household drugs, such as decongestants and antihistamines are known to affect the moisture level of your eyes. Other medications that could cause dry eyes include: antidepressants, hormone replacement therapy, acne drugs, medication for Parkinson’s disease, hypertension treatment and birth control.

How Do I Treat My Dry Eyes?

Is Ortho-K Right for You?

What You Need to Know about Orthokeratology

ortho k contact lens on the finger of a young brunette in nob hill san francisco

Ortho-k is a non-invasive method of reshaping your cornea with specialized contact lenses – in order to correct myopia (nearsightedness). The end-goal of orthokeratology is to allow you to see the distance without wearing any glasses or daytime contact lenses. Many nearsightedness people are thrilled to hear about this revolutionary procedure, especially since it doesn’t involve any surgery!

To eliminate any confusion from the start, orthokeratology has many names, yet they all mean the same thing. Whether your friends and family tell you about ortho-k, Vision Shaping Treatment, VST, Corneal Refractive Therapy, CRT, Corneal Molding, Wave Front Corneal Molding, or Gentle Molding, these terms all refer to the same process.

How Does it Work?

Ortho-k involves inserting special hard, gas permeable lenses before you go to sleep each night. While you doze, these lenses will reshape and flatten your cornea gently, thereby correcting refractive error. In the morning, you’ll remove the lenses to find that your myopia is gone! However, the effects of ortho-k are temporary and last only a few days, so you’ll need to wear the lenses nightly to preserve your new crystal-clear vision.

While most people experience some improvement after one night, it can take a few weeks to see the full effects. At the beginning, you may also see halos around lights and night and/or glare, yet these side effects will disappear quickly.

Is Ortho-k for Everyone?

People with healthy eyes and mild to moderate myopia are best suited for ortho-k. In general, this means that you have a lens power less than -4.00 diopters and astigmatism less than -1.50 diopters. As far as age, ortho-k is safe for patients of all ages. So if your child is too young for LASIK, this offers a great alternative!

Some of the most satisfied ortho-k wearers include people who play sports regularly, as well as people who spend a lot of time in dusty environments. With no need to put on bulky eyeglasses or contact lenses that cause irritation, ortho-k is comfortable and convenient for these situations.

However, only a qualified eye doctor can determine if you’re a good candidate for ortho-k. Our San Francisco eye doctors are trained and experienced in fitting ortho-k lenses, and we’ll perform a thorough eye exam to see if they are right for your eyes.

Questions to Ask about Ortho-k

We encourage you to book a consultation with your eye care professionals to discuss ortho-k. It’s important to ask all your questions, such as:

  • Am I a good candidate for effective results with ortho-k?
  • How often will I need to visit my eye doctor during orthokeratology treatment?
  • Is ortho-k the best option for my vision condition?
  • How much will ortho-k cost?
  • Are there any risks involved with this method?

What Happens During an Ortho-k Fitting?

First, your eye doctor will measure the refraction of your eyes to confirm the degree of myopia, astigmatism or farsightedness. Afterwards, corneal topography will be used to map the shape of your eye surface. This digital imagery procedure is quick and painless, and it will help determine the ideal shape for your cornea. According to the exact specifications needed for your eyes, your optometrist will custom-order specialized ortho-k lenses.

Is Ortho-k for Children Too?

Yes, ortho-k can be great for kids, especially as a means of myopia control. Many studies have shown how ortho-k lenses mold and suppress the cornea, thereby suppressing eye growth. When this happens, kids’ eyes don’t continue deteriorating to a higher degree of myopia.

Why is this a good thing? In addition to eliminating the need to replace your child’s eyeglasses yearly with more powerful lenses, very high nearsightedness in children is also linked to eye health problems later in life. When kids vision prescriptions get worse constantly, it is worthwhile to seriously consider myopia control with ortho-k!

Benefits of Ortho-k

If you are considering this method of vision correction, here’s a summary of what you have to gain:

  • Available for most patients
  • No need to wear daily eyewear: convenient and comfortable eyesight
  • Improved vision (better than with eyeglasses)
  • Non-surgical
  • Myopia control for kids: no new eyeglasses yearly, and reduced eye health risks

Holiday Season Shopping: Are Nerf Guns Safe for the Eyes?

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Nerf guns or blasters come in a remarkable number of shapes and sizes and have become incredibly popular for use in the home and even in large scale “Nerf Wars”.  However publicity surrounding the toy has not been all positive.  Many parents out there are questioning the safety of the toy foam guns, particularly to the eyes, before making the purchase.

The question of safety ultimately comes down to the user.  Nerf darts are relatively soft, foamy and not inherently dangerous, but if shot in the wrong way, they could cause pain or even serious injury. This is particularly true of the eyes because they are a vulnerable organ that can be damaged easily upon impact. Injuries from even a soft projectile could include corneal abrasions (surface scratches), bleeding, cataracts and even retinal detachment which can lead to permanent vision loss. 

Nevertheless, Nerf guns are fun and can even be used to help motor development and other skills, so with the right guidelines, children can learn to use them safely and benefit from the enjoyment they provide. 

Want surefire eye safety? Wear safety glasses!

The best defense for your eyes is safety glasses.  This is the one way you can be sure that you or your child’s eyes are truly safe during Nerf shooting.  We strongly recommend safety glasses be worn during any play that involves projectile objects, particularly for small children or during serious games such as Nerf Wars.

General rules of Nerf Gun play:

  1. Never shoot at the face.
  2. Never look into the barrel of the nerf gun, even if you think it isn’t loaded. 
  3. Avoid walking around with your finger on the trigger until you are ready to point and aim at the proper target. 
  4. Only shoot others that are “playing” and are aware that you are aiming at them.
  5. Don’t shoot from a moving vehicle (including a bicycle, skateboard, rollerblades, etc.).
  6. Don’t shoot at a moving vehicle.
  7. Never shoot at a close range.   
  8. Never leave loaded gun in reach of a child or individual that is not able to use the toy properly and safely. 

To be safe, all toy guns that shoot projectiles should be treated as a dangerous toy in order to ensure proper usage and precautions. Yes, Nerf guns can cause serious eye damage and even vision loss, but these type of injuries can be caused by many “harmless” objects as well. Before you purchase a toy like this for your child, ask yourself whether the child is old enough and mature enough to understand the safety issues involved and to be able to use it responsibly.  

Dry Eye Syndrome Causes and Cures

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Why Are My Eyes So Dry?

Do you experience dry, scratchy, burning eyes, redness or pain, a gritty feeling like something is in your eye? Or perhaps, excessive tearing, blurred vision, eye fatigue or discomfort wearing contact lenses? There could be a number of causes for your symptoms including allergies, reactions to an irritant or medication or an infection. You could also have a chronic condition called Dry Eye Syndrome.

It’s estimated that one out of every eight adults suffers to some extent from dry eye syndrome, which can range from mild to severe. Despite the fact that it is one of the most common eye problems, a surprisingly large percentage of patients are not aware of it.

What is Dry Eye Syndrome?

Your eyes need a layer of tears to lubricate the surface and keep the eyes comfortable, clean and clear. These tears also wash away particles, dust and bacteria that can lead to infection and eye damage. Dry eye syndrome occurs when there is a chronic lack of lubrication on the surface of the eye either because not enough tears are being produced, the quality of the tears is weak or they evaporate too quickly. This causes the common uncomfortable symptoms including:

  • Itching
  • Burning
  • Redness
  • Soreness or pain
  • Dryness (and sometimes even excessive tearing because the eyes are trying to compensate)
  • Light sensitivity
  • Eye fatigue
  • Blurred vision
  • Grittiness or a feeling like there is something in your eye
  • Vision seems to change when blinking

Factors that Contribute to Dry Eye Syndrome

There are a number of factors that can increase your risk of suffering from Dry Eye Syndrome. While some of them are inherent, there are some environmental factors that can be changed to reduce your risk or symptoms. Risk factors include:

  • Aging: While it can occur at any age, dry eye is more common in individuals over age 50. 
  • Women: Likely related to hormonal fluctuations, women are more likely to develop dry eyes than men, especially during pregnancy, menopause or when using birth control pills. 
  • Digital screen use: Whether it is a computer, a smartphone or a tablet, when our eyes are focused on a digital screen we tend to blink less, increasing tear evaporation and increasing dryness, blurriness and discomfort. Remember to regularly take a break, look away from the screen and blink several times.
  • Medications: A number of medications – both prescription and nonprescription – have been found to cause dry eye symptoms including certain blood pressure regulators, antihistamines, nasal decongestants, tranquilizers and antidepressants. 
  • Contact lenses: Dry eyes is a common problem in contact lens wear. Several manufacturers have started offering lenses that hold more moisture to combat this common issue. 
  • Dry air: Whether it is the air conditioning or forced-air heating inside or the dry, windy climate outside, the environment of the air around you can contribute to dry eyes by causing your tears to evaporate too quickly. 
  • LASIK: One side effect of LASIK and other corneal refractive surgery is dry eyes, which usually lasts about 3-6 months and eventually resolves itself. 
  • Eyelid conditions: Certain conditions which prevent the eyelid from closing completely when sleeping or even blinking can cause the eye to try out.
  • Allergies or infections: Chronic inflammation of the conjunctiva which is often caused by allergies or infections such as Blepharitis can result in dry eyes. 
  • Systemic diseases: People with autoimmune diseases or systemic conditions such as diabetes, thyroid disease, Sjogren’s syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis and lupus are also more prone to Dry Eye. 

How do you treat dry eye symptoms?

If you have dry eyes, you don’t need to suffer. There are a number of treatment options that can help, depending on the severity and cause of your condition, which can reduce symptoms and enhance your comfort.

Treatments for dry eyes can include non-prescription or prescription eye drops, omega 3 supplements, special lid therapies, punctal plugs, ointments, different contact lenses, goggles or ergonomic changes to your work station. Speak to your eye doctor to discuss the cause of your dry eye and the best remedy for you. Even when it comes to the seemingly straightforward treatments like over-the-counter eye drops, they aren’t all the same. Different ingredients are tailored towards different causes of dry eye.

Get Help for Dry Eyes Today!

If you are experiencing the symptoms above, schedule an appointment with your eye doctor to find out the best solution for you.

November is Diabetes Awareness Month

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Diabetes is a growing health crisis in North America as an estimated 29 million Americans and 3.4 million Canadians are currently living with the disease. Chances are it affects you or someone you know. November has been dedicated as a time to spread awareness about the disease, its risk factors and the effects it has on your body, your daily life and the lives of your loved ones.

Diabetes and Your Eyes

Diabetes is a systemic disease that causes fluctuations in glucose (blood sugar) levels which can affect blood vessels throughout the body including those in your eyes and visual system. People with diabetes are at higher risk for blindness than the general population, however with regular eye exams and proper care, most of the complications are minor and treatable.

Minor changes in glucose levels could result in complications such as blurred or double vision, floaters or even visual field loss. These conditions are usually quite treatable. Diabetics are also at greater risk for developing eye diseases such as glaucoma (40% increase risk) and cataracts (60% increased risk). With early detection, both of these conditions can be treated and the majority of vision restored.

Diabetic eye disease often has NO noticeable symptoms or pain, so comprehensive eye exams that include dilating the pupils are essential to detect signs of diabetes. Online vision assessments will not detect diabetic eye disease.

The condition that is the most concerning risk of diabetes is called diabetic retinopathy which can lead to blindness if not diagnosed and treated.

What You Need to Know About Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy occurs when the tiny blood vessels or capillaries in the back of the eye develop weakened vessel walls. If not treated, the vessels leak fluid and become blocked. This can progress to hemorrhages in the retina, and over time the eye does not receive enough oxygen and nutrients. As a result, new fine blood vessels start to grow. These proliferating vessels leak and can cause further bleeding, scarring and potentially lead to blindness. A special zone in the central retina called the macula is especially susceptible to diabetes. Diabetic macular edema (when fluid seeps into the macula) can cause permanent vision loss if not promptly detected.

There are treatments for stopping the progression of the disease such as laser therapy or intraocular injections, although once damage to vision has occurred, it is often permanent. This is why the condition must be diagnosed and treated early on.

All diabetics should have a regular comprehensive eye exam to catch any early signs of diabetic retinopathy or other vision threatening conditions. Because risk factors vary, speak to your eye doctor about how often you should have an exam. Risk factors for diabetic retinopathy include:

  • Length of time living with diabetes
  • Uncontrolled blood sugar levels
  • High blood pressure
  • Smoking
  • Alcohol consumption
  • Pregnancy
  • Genetics

Although blindness from diabetes is preventable it is still a leading cause of blindness among working-age adults. If you or someone you know has the disease, make sure that proper eye care is a priority.

Don’t Let Fall Eye Allergies Get You Down

jamie in the fall

Red, itchy, watery eyes and swollen eyelids (along with sneezing, congestion or a runny nose)… these symptoms are a clear indication that allergy season has arrived. These allergic symptoms are caused by a reaction to allergens, which are substances in the environment that are usually harmless. If, however, you are one of the unlucky that is predisposed to allergies, these substances can illicit a serious and sometimes even debilitating allergic response. 

As opposed to food, medicine, or insect allergies which don’t often affect the eyes, eye allergies are a common symptom of airborne allergens including mold, pollen (from trees and flowers), dust and pet dander. The summer fall and spring are often the worst times for a high pollen count and many individuals suffer during these seasons. 

An allergic eye reaction occurs when your eye releases histamines in an effort to protect itself from a perceived threat (an allergen such as dust, pollen, animal dander, mold spores, eye drops or airborne chemicals). The release of the histamines causes the symptoms of redness, itchiness, burning and tearing. This response is also sometimes known as allergic conjunctivitis. 

The most common type of eye allergies are perennial and seasonal allergic conjunctivitis. Perennial eye allergies are a response to household allergens that exist all year round such as pet dander, mold, or dust mites. Seasonal allergies usually result from pollen from plants, grass and trees that are found in the air and depend on the season and the types of pollens in the environment.  Seasonal allergic conjunctivitis is often more severe than perennial and can cause puffy eyelids and itching which can make symptoms worse. 

The best way to reduce discomfort and prevent an allergic reaction is to stay away from allergens as much as possible. Here are some tips on how to reduce exposure:

  • Minimize outdoor exposure during pollen season: 
  • Stay inside when pollen counts are particularly high or during a windy day.
  • Keep windows closed and use air conditioner with a clean filter.
  • Wear sunglasses outside to keep irritants from entering the eyes. 
  • Reduce indoor allergens:
  • Wash bedding frequently in hot water and use mite-proof covers on pillows, blankets and mattresses. 
  • Prevent household mold by reducing humidity and keeping areas that are subject to humidity or dampness (such as bathrooms, kitchens or basements) clean. Use a dehumidifier when necessary and clean any mold you see with bleach. 
  • To reduce dust, clean floors and surfaces with a damp rag or mop rather than sweeping or dry dusting. 
  • Wash your hands and clothes after coming into contact with animals.
  • DO NOT rub your eyes as this can worsen symptoms, greatly aggravating swelling and itchiness, and can sometimes even cause an infection. 

If you have severe allergies, avoid contact lens wear or reduce wear time when allergies flare up, as contact lenses can worsen symptoms and do not fit as they normally would when the eyes are swollen. This is why having back up glasses is so important. Changing to one day single use disposable contacts can also sometimes reduce allergy symptoms.   

There are some steps you can take to alleviate symptoms of eye allergies. Over-the-counter solutions include artificial tears, decongestant eye drops (which shouldn’t be used for longer than a week) or oral antihistamines (which can sometimes worsen symptoms). If no eye drops are available, cool compresses (avoid heat) will also help to reduce the itch.  If these treatments don’t work, you can get a prescription for stronger eye drops (antihistamine or short term steroid drops to reduce symptoms), oral antihistamines or possibly immunotherapy (such as allergy shots).

If you are experiencing symptoms of allergic conjunctivitis, don’t just assume they are allergies. See your eye doctor to determine the cause to ensure that it is not a more serious eye condition. 

How Contact Lenses Can be a Danger to your Eyes

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Most people wouldn’t consider contact lenses dangerous. In fact, they are a great alternative to glasses, offering convenience and great vision for those who wear them. However, when not obtained and used according to an eye doctor’s instructions, the consequences can be devastating.  

Contact Lenses Need to Fit

Like shoes, one size of contact lens does not fit all. Even daily disposable contact lenses need a proper lens fitting, as lens materials and curvatures vary from one brand to the next. Often patients that complain of contact lenses that feel dry within a couple hours of applying them are actually wearing contact lenses that are not an ideal fit. Many factors can affect a lens fit, including growth, allergies, medications, hormone changes, and others.   Sensitivities to eye drops and cleaning solutions may also affect comfortable contact lens wear.  

The Dangers of Contact Lens Use

We all know how uncomfortable it is when there is a foreign object in our eye. The tearing and watering that occurs as the eye’s natural attempt to remove foreign matter displays the eye’s sensitivity compared to other parts of the body.  Any time a foreign object comes into contact with the eye (even your finger), there is a risk to the eye – and that risk includes contact lenses.  Improper hygiene and useage of contact lenses can scratch the surface or bring bacteria into the eye which can lead to serious infections and permanent damage to the eye and vision.

According to a recent report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, almost 20% of patients that reported infections of the cornea related to contact lenses had a corneal scar, a decrease in visual acuity or needed a corneal transplant as a result of the infection.  Further, 25% of infections involved poor contact lens hygiene, which means they likely could have been prevented.

Dangerous Behaviors that Put Contact Lens Users At Risk

Here are some of the most dangerous contact lens habits that should be avoided to eliminate your risk of eye damage or a potentially blinding eye infection.

  • Failing to wash your hands with soap and dry them before applying or removing lenses.
  • Rinsing contacts or your lens case with tap water, sterile water or other substances.
  • Re-using solution or topping off the solution in your lens case rather than emptying it, cleaning it and refilling it.
  • Failing to remove lenses before swimming or entering a hot tub.
  • Leaving in contact lenses too long or sleeping in contacts that are not meant to sleep in.
  • Failing to follow the wearing schedule prescribed by your eye doctor.
  • Using the same lens case for too long (it should be cleaned regularly and replaced around every three months).
  • Wearing lenses that are not obtained with a prescription through an eye doctor or legally authorized contact lens distributor.
  • Ironically, as you can see, water is one of the biggest dangers for contact lens wearers at it can harbor dangerous bacteria under the lens or in a contaminated lens case.  These dangers can be easily avoided by following your eye doctor’s instructions in handling and wearing your contact lenses.

Cosmetic/Decorative Contact Lenses

With Halloween on the way it’s important to stress that you should ONLY purchase contact lenses from an eye doctor or legally authorized contact lens seller with a prescription. Even if you are purchasing  purely decorative contact lenses with no vision correction, you need a doctor to measure your eye to ensure they fit properly.  Contact lenses are a medical device and it is illegal to sell them without proper authorization. Therefore you should never purchase them from a costume or party store – they are unregulated and could cause serious harm to your eyes and vision.

If you notice any unusual redness, discharge, crusting, light sensitivity or pain, immediately remove your contact lenses and go see your eye doctor as soon as possible. Some serious eye infections can cause permanent vision damage or loss even within a day or two.

While you should not approach contact lens use as a dangerous activity, it is important to understand the importance of proper hygiene and use.  As long as you obtain contact lenses safely and follow the instructions of your eye doctor, contact lenses are a safe, convenient and effective option for vision correction.

Welcome to our New Website

We invite you to take a look around our new site to get to know our practice and learn about eye and vision health. You will find a wealth of information about our optometrists, our staff and our services, as well as facts and advice about how to take care of your eyes and protect your vision.

Learn about our Practice specialties including comprehensive eye exams, contact lens fittings and the treatment of eye diseases. Our website also offers you a convenient way to find our hours, address and map, schedule an appointment online, order contact lenses or contact us to ask us any questions you have about eye care and our Practice.

Have a look around our online office and schedule a visit to meet us in person. We are here to partner with you and your family for a lifetime of healthy eyes and vision. We look forward to seeing you!

Pink, Stinging Eyes?

Conjunctivitis, also called pink eye, is one of the most frequently seen eye diseases, especially in kids. It can be caused by viruses, bacteria or even allergies to pollen, chlorine in swimming pools, and ingredients in cosmetics, or other irritants, which touch the eyes. Some forms of conjunctivitis might be quite transmittable and quickly spread in school and at the office.

Conjunctivitis is seen when the conjunctiva, or thin transparent layer of tissue covering the white part of the eye, becomes inflamed. You can identify conjunctivitis if you notice eye redness, discharge, itching or swollen eyelids and a crusty discharge surrounding the eyes early in the day. Pink eye infections can be divided into three main types: viral, allergic and bacterial conjunctivitis.

The viral type is usually a result of a similar virus to that which produces the recognizable red, watery eyes, sore throat and runny nose of the common cold. The red, itchy, watery eyes caused by viral pink eye are likely to last from a week to two and then will clear up on their own. You may however, be able to reduce some of the discomfort by using soothing drops or compresses. Viral pink eye is transmittable until it is completely cleared up, so in the meantime maintain excellent hygiene, remove eye discharge and try to avoid using communal pillowcases or towels. If your son or daughter has viral conjunctivitis, he or she will have to be kept home from school for three days to a week until symptoms disappear.

A bacterial infection such as Staphylococcus or Streptococcus is usually treated with antibiotic eye drops or cream. One should notice an improvement within just a few days of antibiotic drops, but be sure to adhere to the full prescription dosage to prevent pink eye from recurring.

Allergic pink eye is not contagious. It is usually a result of a known allergy such as hay fever or pet allergies that sets off an allergic reaction in their eyes. First of all, to treat allergic pink eye, you should eliminate the irritant. Use cool compresses and artificial tears to relieve discomfort in mild cases. When the infection is more severe, your eye doctor might prescribe a medication such as an anti-inflammatory or antihistamine. In cases of chronic allergic pink eye, topical steroid eye drops could be used.

Pink eye should always be diagnosed by a qualified eye doctor in order to identify the type and best course of treatment. Never treat yourself! Keep in mind the sooner you begin treatment, the lower chance you have of giving pink eye to loved ones or prolonging your discomfort.